Compliance Insider

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Banks may be required to ensure vendors have warranties

One of New York’s financial regulators has said that he is considering a new rule that requires banks to obtain representations and warranties from vendors to increase cybersecurity. Benjamin M Lawsky emphasised to banks the increasing danger of the cyber world and warned that the monitoring vendors’ security is needed to thwart hackers.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

SFO’s request for more funding may cause political interference

The United Kingdom’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has asked the Treasury for 75 percent more funding for high-profile investigations. The request has provoked concerns that if the funding is granted the SFO may become subject to political influence, and therefore lose its impartial stance.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

India’s corruption crackdown provokes fears

An unprecedented ban on one of India’s largest property developers has provoked fears of tough penalties for corruption, as the country attempts to rid itself of the problem. As a result, the share value of those companies being investigated dropped over the last week, adding to a yearlong slump in the stocks of those companies seen as tied to the country’s Congress party.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Dialysis company settles fraud allegations

One of the United States’ leading providers of dialysis services has agreed to pay US$350 million to settle allegations that it violated the United States False Claims Act. The company is alleged to have paid kickbacks to win the referral of patients to its clinics. DaVita HealthCare Partners was accused of identifying physicians or groups of physicians that had a significant number of patients with renal disease. It then offered them lucrative deals to purchase an interest in its clinics, to which the physicians could then make referrals. DeVita also entered into agreements with the physicians stating that they would not compete with the DaVita clinic and they would not refer patients to other dialysis providers.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

United Kingdom banks should embrace more compliance

Banks in the United Kingdom have been complaining about the increasing number of regulations they face in the coming years, warning that they will cost the country its reputation as a global financial centre. Banks with deposits of at least US$40 billion will be required to ‘ring fence’ their retail banking activities from their investment banking activities by 2019. In addition, senior managers will be held more accountable for the misconduct of staff. And provisions will be introduced to control and rein in bonuses.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Employee and employer reach stalemate over contract breach

An employee of a Housing Association claims to have blown the whistle on an overspend by his employer only to find himself subject to a breach of confidentiality as his emails were searched. The search uncovered breaches in the employee’s contract, leaving both parties in a stalemate that resulted in the employee resigning but potentially sacrificing compensation.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Compliance officer alters document for SEC investigation

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has announced it is enforcing action against a former compliance officer at Wells Fargo Advisors for altering a document used in an investigation. Judy K Wolf was responsible for uncovering suspicious trading at Wells Fargo and then identifying whether or not the trades had been based on non-public information. She subsequently created a document in 2010 to report her findings, and concluded that there was nothing of note to disclose.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Managers suspended as Tesco probe widens

Tesco has suspended three senior managers amid a growing crisis since the new chief executive launched a probe into an estimated £250 million (almost US$400 million) profit overstatement. William Linnane was responsible for the buying of impulse purchases; Dan Jago was responsible for the buying of wines and spirits; and Sean McCurely was responsible for convenience.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Snapchat blames the use of third parties for leaked photos

Explicit images have been hacked from Snapchat and distributed online, but the social media messenger denies any fault and blames the downloading of third party applications (apps) by users. Thousands of photos have been leaked from Snapchat, which is an app that allows people to send photos, videos or messages that ‘disappear’ after they have been viewed. Users who have been using the service via a third party app have fallen victim to widespread hacking.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Wisconsin podiatrist accused of defrauding the Government

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) has filed a civil complaint in a Milwaukee federal court, accusing a Wisconsin-based podiatrist of defrauding government health insurance programmes and violating the United States False Claims Act (FCA). Alan Balkansky runs the Healthy Foot and Ankle and Grafton Podiatry Group and is accused of submitting false diagnoses for patients in order to submit false claims to Medicare.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Infosys accused of whistleblower retaliation

The compliance practices and culture at Indian multinational corporation Infosys are to be re-examined following a second lawsuit by a former employee. Jack Palmer filed his latest suit in a New Jersey district court, seeking reappointment and compensation for alleged wrongful termination. The whistleblower’s first suit three years ago concerned possible visa violations at the company.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Apps help build transparency in Latin America

A number of new Applications (apps) have been launched in South America to help build transparency in the dealings of officials. Each app performs a different function, from revealing the history of government members and monitoring the spending of events to holding officials accountable to promises made during elections.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Transatlantic partners seek cyber threat collaboration

Financial Groups in the United States have called for the improved sharing of information between financial institutions on cyber threats. The call comes as the United Kingdom looks to implement technology to address the same problem. Following attacks on JP Morgan, the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Centre (FS-ISAC) teamed up with the Depositary Trust and Clearing Corporation to try and develop a new way to share intelligence automatically in the United States.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Transatlantic regulators get tough on insider trading

Regulators on both sides of the Atlantic have in the past week reinforced a clear message to compliance-challenged companies, and rogue employees, that insider trading will not be tolerated. In the United States, charges have been brought against two former Wells Fargo employees for buying or short selling stock prior to publication of research analyst reports containing rating changes, while the United Kingdom has witnessed yet another scandal involving one of its ‘big four’ supermarket chains.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Uganda introduces whistleblowing phone app

Uganda has introduced an app to allow people to anonymously report information when they think that public funding for schools and hospitals is not reaching its intended destination. The Action for Transparency (A4T) app is being piloted by three Ugandan districts and was developed in Sweden.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

First active politician jailed for corruption in India

The popular chief minister of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu has been jailed for four years and banned from politics for 10 years. She was convicted for an 18 year-old corruption case, making her the first chief minister to be found guilty while still in office.

Issue 12 > Compliance Alerts

Software company fined for inadequate internal controls

An Arizona-based software company has been fined by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for having inadequate internal controls over its financial reports. The lack of the controls led to it over-stating revenue by four percent in 2010 and earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation by 18 percent.